What do do in your area this month. In addition to our print events, you can browse our online events calendar. 

Follow these simple tips to keep yourself warm and dry during the winter months

A local relationship expert offers 7 tips to update your skills

Every afternoon, Amtrak’s eastbound Empire Builder pulls out of Portland’s Union Station headed through the Columbia Gorge to Spokane where, in the wee hours of the morning, it hooks up to the train originating in Seattle.

When Carl Arden Hinds envisioned opening a music school, he thought about what would have appealed to him as a 16-year-old musician: A place where students not only could hone their playing and writing skills, but also rehearse together, learn how to record tunes and perform live with a group.

When your whole world is just a bed and a few personal items, a bouquet of lovely flowers can make your day. Heidi Berkman discovered that fact when caring for her stepmother’s mother in her final days. She remembers how the mood indoors often matched the gloomy January weather outside. There was no sun to fill her stepmother’s condominium, and little to perk up her disposition.

The Willamette Shore Trolley may be one of Oregon’s best-kept secrets, and a real gem for those who make the time for a ride. It’s only a mile and a half, but there’s so much to see and hear, it can take up to an hour and a half.

With the warmer weather and longer days, summertime is the perfect opportunity to get outside and be active. If you’re exercising outdoors this summer, or just having fun in the sun, it’s important to be aware of heat-related illnesses, like heat stroke and exhaustion, and know how to prevent them.

Several months ago, I was corresponding via email with famed plantsman Allan Armitage about — obviously — plants. In the course of our conversation, he offered me a copy of his latest book, “Of Naked Ladies and Forget-Me-Nots: The Stories Behind the Common Names of Some of Our Favorite Plants,” to read and review. I gladly accepted and promptly received the book in my mailbox.

Does it matter how we live and how we treat one another? Have we lost our graciousness? Has our culture coarsened beyond repair?

Phyllis Yes has taken the real-life challenge of caring for her aging parents and turned it into a screenplay that examines the issues facing adult children as caregivers.

Financial donations from women have made possible an early scientific discovery that could have an impact on Alzheimer’s research. It brings new hope to the fight against this and related diseases wreaking havoc on those with memory loss. Dementia has emerged as one of the great medical challenges of our time.

Dave Lemberg doesn’t remember how old he was when he first saw a commercial for TV Magic Cards, but he certainly recollects how it made him feel. He was so excited that the cards went straight on his Christmas wish list, and the eventual gift launched a lifelong interest in magic tricks. Lemberg grew up in southwest Washington and eventually became a teacher. Early in his career, he attended a convention where a presenter used magic tricks to teach science.

When you look around your favorite grocery store or restaurant, it’s apparent that gluten-free foods have gone mainstream, which may leave you wondering: Are gluten-free diets a fad or are they actually a healthy way of eating?

Dennis Nielson has had his share of victories on the tennis court. The 83-year-old resident of Vancouver, Washington is ranked by the U.S. Tennis Association as the No. 1 hardcourt player in the 80- to 85-year-old age group in Oregon, Washington and British Columbia. But he doesn’t measure success by wins and losses.

Think of some of your best memories. How does it make you feel to remember them? How does it feel when you get to share them? Everyone has a story – probably many more than just one. Yet, a person can go through life and never really feel understood or listened to, even among their family and closest friends.

Think knitting is just something your grandma used to do? Not so, says Jackie Howard Kraybill, owner of Northwest Wools in Portland. She believes a resurgence in knitting may be due to the unsettling times in which we live.

From hurricanes to earthquakes to fires, the recent disasters in North America have taught us a lot. We’ve seen how neighbor reached out to neighbor and, stranger to stranger.

Almost everyone taking a vacation today uses their own camera or phone to capture memories of places they’ve been and things they’ve seen. But a century ago, few people had their own camera and, when they went on a trip, they would typically buy a postcard view of the place they were visiting.

Although not in the traditional sense, Ronald Paapke’s doctor was with him all the way through his recent health emergency. “It was as if the doctor was actually in the room with me,” says Paapke, 54, who suffered a stroke on Sept. 19. “As I moved, the telecom screen was following me. Where I went, the doctor went. It was pretty amazing.”

This year marks the 70th anniversary of the Marshall Plan, the post-World War II effort to revitalize a devastated Western Europe. In 1947, from London to Moscow, cities were flattened, economies destroyed, homes left in rubble, and millions of people displaced. In the midst of this destitution existed, as President Harry S. Truman observed, a breeding ground for the spread of communism throughout Europe.

For the past four years, Neal Ballard has helped install cameras that capture images of animals in southwest Washington’s Gifford Pinchot National Forest. He has always loved to hike, but this volunteer work setting up wildlife cameras in remote areas for a nonprofit organization allows him to venture off established trails to “see places I never would have seen before.”

A former church in Hillsboro known for its hand-quarried red rock exterior is now a thriving arts center that invites all ages to its varied programming. The Walters Cultural Arts Center, located in downtown Hillsboro, and just two blocks from the MAX Blue Line, has been serving local residents with arts-based classes, concerts, lectures and more since 2004.

Jean Blaske and Nadia Cieslak are like most people who enjoy going out to eat. They aren’t beholden to food critics and those deft use of adjectives to describe dishes. Instead, they are co-workers at AAA who like exploring restaurants on their own.

“The eclipse is coming, the eclipse is coming.” In China, 715 years ago, that statement would’ve been met with fear and worry over what disaster the darkening of the skies would foretell to fall upon the leader.

Gerald Gaule was just a boy when he had his first on-air experience in radio. He was at the Clark County Fair in southwest Washington when he came upon a radio station disc jockey broadcasting remotely. Gaule, already a fan of radio who loved to listen to his shortwave and create radio shows at home, watched and listened to the DJ for two or three hours.

Imagine you are a mother with two children, struggling to make ends meet. You finally are able to get an apartment, but you have not even a chair to sit on, or the warm glow of a lamp for evening light. As the founder of Community Warehouse, Roz Bebener heard this story countless times.

When getting ready for bed, good health habits mean brushing your teeth and washing your face. But what about when you’re tucked in and just can’t seem to fall asleep no matter how many sheep you count?

A chance conversation among teenagers in an ice cream parlor led Harry Hendricks not only to contribute to America’s war effort, but learn lifetime job skills. It happened in 1943, when Hendricks — barely a teen himself — struck up a conversation with another teen working at the bustling shipyards run by businessman Henry J. Kaiser on the north side of the Columbia River, where thousands of workers were churning out U.S. military vessels during World War II.

Pet owners know first-hand that dogs and cats love unconditionally; they are there when the person needs a hug or a smile. This love and acceptance make dogs and cats ideal therapeutic visitors for the elderly and disabled in nursing homes and care facilities.

Sarah Gradis’ patient was an older woman experiencing chronic pain, primarily in her back and legs. The woman was independent, lived on her own and was reluctant to ask her family for help with everyday tasks. But she was having difficulty with things like housework, and was feeling increasingly isolated and concerned she might fall.

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