Getting screened early for memory loss won’t prevent it from happening, but it can mean the difference in how it’s treated and your quality of life.

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\If you’re age 65 or older, you face an increased risk of falling down: one out of four fall every year. After falling once, your chances of falling again doubles. Falls can cause serious injury — to the brain or hip — and significantly impact mobility. Each year, 2.8 million people over age…

We tend to think of our DNA as belonging to us alone. After all, DNA, or scientifically speaking, deoxyribonucleic acid, is what defines us as individuals.

Caring for a loved one with dementia can be challenging and at times, overwhelming. Currently, more than 16 million Americans provide unpaid care for people living with Alzheimer’s or other dementias. Salem resident and former caregiver Susan Jones cared for her partner Elizabeth for 12 year…

Educate yourself about the options available in continuing care communities, which range from independent living to skilled nursing care. 

Growing evidence indicates that people can reduce their risk of cognitive decline by adopting key lifestyle habits.

With summer around the corner and the warm temperatures we experienced earlier this month, keeping cool will be a priority. While heat-related illness is preventable, many people get sick, and even die, from extreme heat each year.

The numbers are startling: 5.7 million Americans are living with Alzheimer’s disease.

Fibromyalgia sufferers know what it’s like to live with chronic pain and have their lives turned upside down.

For anyone living with a chronic disease, whether it’s cancer, an auto-immune disorder, pain issues or any other health problem, it is imperative that you optimize your intestinal health.

In an interview with AARP some years back, they mentioned that so many people serving as caregivers don’t necessarily see themselves or identify as a caregiver. They asked, “How do people know if they are indeed a caregiver?”

May is Mental Health Awareness month and a good time to be open about mental health. Statistics tell us that one in five people in the United States experience a mental health problem every year, including seniors.

Judith Kahn started running at age 40 but was derailed by a stroke in her late 50s and suffers from congestive heart failure.

Our kidneys work hard to keep us healthy so it is good to take some time to think about what we can do to keep them healthy. Our kidneys work 24/7 filtering our blood, removing toxins and fluids to keep our bodies well.

Ohsu sports medicine specialist offers tips for resistance exercise and strength training as we age

Walt Blomberg views fitness as a lifetime plan and, at 69, the Woodburn athlete can still be called a “jock.”

Heart health is a very important topic. Many of the people I work with have atrial fibrillation, or a-fib, on some level. A-fib is when the upper chambers of the heart get too many signals to beat, so the heart quivers without really giving a good strong beat.

Brad Pendergraft acts out strategies to interrupt negative thought patterns. Worrying, he says, doesn’t have to be a constant in your life. You can change.

A local relationship expert offers 7 tips to update your skills

By age 50, the average person will have walked 75,000 miles, according to the American Podiatric Medical Association. That’s a lot of steps, even without the Fitbit tracker.

Recognizing the symptoms of a stroke as quickly as possible and calling 911 is key to having the best recovery possible. However, getting to the hospital is just the first of four phases in your recovery.

At age 76, Elaine Graziani of Salem says she makes staying fit a priority, taking advantage of local programs and her natural surroundings.

The ultimate fix for aging joints is to “stay strong or get strong.” When it comes to joints, physical therapist Mike Studer, president and co-owner of Northwest Rehabilitation Associates, strongly believes strength is paramount to healthy aging.

With the warmer weather and longer days, summertime is the perfect opportunity to get outside and be active. If you’re exercising outdoors this summer, or just having fun in the sun, it’s important to be aware of heat-related illnesses, like heat stroke and exhaustion, and know how to prevent them.

Many of my patients say they use sunscreen on a daily basis, but they’ll still come into the office with sunburns or tans. (Worth noting: Even though a tan might not hurt like a burn and “looks better,” tans are harmful to the skin, too.) So, what gives?

Before I went to medical school, I was a music student and earned a bachelor’s degree in classical guitar performance. My roommate was a jazz guitarist and, while at the school, I met my wife, who was a vocal major. I was surrounded by music.

Does it matter how we live and how we treat one another? Have we lost our graciousness? Has our culture coarsened beyond repair?