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Caring for a loved one with dementia can be challenging and at times, overwhelming. Currently, more than 16 million Americans provide unpaid care for people living with Alzheimer’s or other dementias. Salem resident and former caregiver Susan Jones cared for her partner Elizabeth for 12 year…

Educate yourself about the options available in continuing care communities, which range from independent living to skilled nursing care. 

Growing evidence indicates that people can reduce their risk of cognitive decline by adopting key lifestyle habits.

With summer around the corner and the warm temperatures we experienced earlier this month, keeping cool will be a priority. While heat-related illness is preventable, many people get sick, and even die, from extreme heat each year.

The numbers are startling: 5.7 million Americans are living with Alzheimer’s disease.

Fibromyalgia sufferers know what it’s like to live with chronic pain and have their lives turned upside down.

For anyone living with a chronic disease, whether it’s cancer, an auto-immune disorder, pain issues or any other health problem, it is imperative that you optimize your intestinal health.

In an interview with AARP some years back, they mentioned that so many people serving as caregivers don’t necessarily see themselves or identify as a caregiver. They asked, “How do people know if they are indeed a caregiver?”

May is Mental Health Awareness month and a good time to be open about mental health. Statistics tell us that one in five people in the United States experience a mental health problem every year, including seniors.

Judith Kahn started running at age 40 but was derailed by a stroke in her late 50s and suffers from congestive heart failure.

Our kidneys work hard to keep us healthy so it is good to take some time to think about what we can do to keep them healthy. Our kidneys work 24/7 filtering our blood, removing toxins and fluids to keep our bodies well.

Ohsu sports medicine specialist offers tips for resistance exercise and strength training as we age

Walt Blomberg views fitness as a lifetime plan and, at 69, the Woodburn athlete can still be called a “jock.”

Heart health is a very important topic. Many of the people I work with have atrial fibrillation, or a-fib, on some level. A-fib is when the upper chambers of the heart get too many signals to beat, so the heart quivers without really giving a good strong beat.

Brad Pendergraft acts out strategies to interrupt negative thought patterns. Worrying, he says, doesn’t have to be a constant in your life. You can change.

A local relationship expert offers 7 tips to update your skills

By age 50, the average person will have walked 75,000 miles, according to the American Podiatric Medical Association. That’s a lot of steps, even without the Fitbit tracker.

Recognizing the symptoms of a stroke as quickly as possible and calling 911 is key to having the best recovery possible. However, getting to the hospital is just the first of four phases in your recovery.

At age 76, Elaine Graziani of Salem says she makes staying fit a priority, taking advantage of local programs and her natural surroundings.

The ultimate fix for aging joints is to “stay strong or get strong.” When it comes to joints, physical therapist Mike Studer, president and co-owner of Northwest Rehabilitation Associates, strongly believes strength is paramount to healthy aging.

With the warmer weather and longer days, summertime is the perfect opportunity to get outside and be active. If you’re exercising outdoors this summer, or just having fun in the sun, it’s important to be aware of heat-related illnesses, like heat stroke and exhaustion, and know how to prevent them.

Many of my patients say they use sunscreen on a daily basis, but they’ll still come into the office with sunburns or tans. (Worth noting: Even though a tan might not hurt like a burn and “looks better,” tans are harmful to the skin, too.) So, what gives?

Before I went to medical school, I was a music student and earned a bachelor’s degree in classical guitar performance. My roommate was a jazz guitarist and, while at the school, I met my wife, who was a vocal major. I was surrounded by music.

Does it matter how we live and how we treat one another? Have we lost our graciousness? Has our culture coarsened beyond repair?

Physical inactivity is a major health concern that contributes to some of our nation’s leading causes of death, including heart disease and stroke. It also increases risk for obesity, diabetes, hypertension, and high cholesterol. Fortunately, there is something we can do about this.

A health practice birthed in the early 1950s is catching on in Salem. Flotation therapy was developed by John C. Lilly, a medical practitioner and neuro- psychiatrist who studied the effect of sensory deprivation on the human brain and mind. What he found was that taking a break away from gravity in a float tank releases endorphins — nature's pain relievers — and is a salve for stress.

The numbers are surprising: The average American consumes 7,000 milligrams of sodium per day. That far exceeds the daily intake recommendation, which is less than 2,500 mg (and even less if you have high blood pressure).

Certified physician assistant Kristina Uehlin started her career in medicine as a medical assistant in a primary care clinic. She met with patients before the doctor, recorded their vitals and noted concerns.

Many of today’s popular diets suggest cutting carbs, but opt for higher proteins and lower fats. However, a diet rising in popularity aims for low carbs, but higher fats with the idea that “fat burns fat.” If you love eating seafood, vegetables and even dark chocolate, the ketogenic diet may be for you.

Thanks to the world’s smallest pacemaker, Ruth Bissett of Salem plans to take up line dancing again, volunteer more at her church and keep up with her big, growing family.

When you look around your favorite grocery store or restaurant, it’s apparent that gluten-free foods have gone mainstream, which may leave you wondering: Are gluten-free diets a fad or are they actually a healthy way of eating?

This probably sounds familiar: You shiver, sweat and your throat is on fire. Your head is pounding, every muscle aches and you’re exhausted. Even getting out of bed seems impossible. You’ve got the flu. It’s not pretty. In fact, it’s pretty awful.