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This past Christmas Day, my beautiful bride of 35 years passed into eternity. Carmela Valentina Coyne had a bubbly persona and loved to encourage others.

Follow these simple tips to keep yourself warm and dry during the winter months

A local relationship expert offers 7 tips to update your skills

By age 50, the average person will have walked 75,000 miles, according to the American Podiatric Medical Association. That’s a lot of steps, even without the Fitbit tracker.

Cradled upright in their holders, still warm from their “just below the boil” simmer, our soft-boiled eggs waited for the crack of a knife across their 75-degree latitude.

I began writing for Northwest50Plus back in 2003 when it was NW Senior News. I remember how unqualified I felt, writing for seniors — people with so much more life experience.

January launches a new year and a new opportunity to look at old issues. The impact of bias when it comes to both race and religious faith provides fertile ground.

Recognizing the symptoms of a stroke as quickly as possible and calling 911 is key to having the best recovery possible. However, getting to the hospital is just the first of four phases in your recovery.

Every afternoon, Amtrak’s eastbound Empire Builder pulls out of Portland’s Union Station headed through the Columbia Gorge to Spokane where, in the wee hours of the morning, it hooks up to the train originating in Seattle.

Every afternoon, Amtrak’s eastbound Empire Builder pulls out of Portland’s Union Station headed through the Columbia Gorge to Spokane where, in the wee hours of the morning, it hooks up to the train originating in Seattle.

A few months ago, I stopped at a neighborhood garage sale and a decorative sign caught my eye. No doubt this sign was a vintage-themed Christmas decoration given the weathered red-and-green-colored letters that spelled out, “It’s the most wonderful time of the year.” The price was right and the sentiment, well, it was perfect.

In our hurry to prepare for a wonderful holiday season, many of us often want to pause and reflect on what really matters during this time of year. The 25th annual Corvallis Nativity Festival is an opportunity to recharge your spirit and add joyful meaning to the Christmas season.

For those with hearing loss, the options for hearing better are usually limited to sitting closer or turning up the volume. But a newer technology is allowing those with hearing aids not only to hear better, but avoid the stigma attached to this common ailment.

If you’re new to gardening, you probably think we who have been at it for a while have our skills perfected and gardens that look fabulous all the time. It’s not true.

At age 76, Elaine Graziani of Salem says she makes staying fit a priority, taking advantage of local programs and her natural surroundings.

The ultimate fix for aging joints is to “stay strong or get strong.” When it comes to joints, physical therapist Mike Studer, president and co-owner of Northwest Rehabilitation Associates, strongly believes strength is paramount to healthy aging.

The golden glow and deeper shadows of the changing seasons are both delightful and a bit painful. I hate to say it, but summer is winding down. The lush borders of July and August are slowly devolving into the sad state of autumn decay.

When Carl Arden Hinds envisioned opening a music school, he thought about what would have appealed to him as a 16-year-old musician: A place where students not only could hone their playing and writing skills, but also rehearse together, learn how to record tunes and perform live with a group.

Two Salem senior centers are taking steps to help the homeless and less-fortunate in their communities. “We still have two or three individuals who look for homeless coming for lunch at our Marion-Polk Food Share lunches,” says Donna Avina, president of South Salem Senior Center. “For quite a while after the homeless camp on Commercial near us was broken up, we had a number, mostly men. Most of these people are gone now, because we heard they broke up the two camps these groups had set up.

The Contreras family owns a small bakery but bakes traditional Mexican goodies with a big heart. “We love what we do,” says Maria Contreras, who runs Pilos Mexican Bakery in Corvallis with her parents, Celestino Contreras Padilla and Marcelina Lopez de Contreras, and brother Alberto Contreras.

A visit to the Museum of Flight, south of Seattle, is not unlike a shopping excursion to Ikea — the facility is vast, sprawling, and packed with tempting tidbits offering a plethora of distractions.

When your whole world is just a bed and a few personal items, a bouquet of lovely flowers can make your day. Heidi Berkman discovered that fact when caring for her stepmother’s mother in her final days. She remembers how the mood indoors often matched the gloomy January weather outside. There was no sun to fill her stepmother’s condominium, and little to perk up her disposition.

Like most teens in the mid-1960s, Robert Santelli found himself glued to the television as Ed Sullivan introduced the Beatles. And, like so many, it was a life-changing experience. On that day — Feb. 9, 1964 — 12-year-old Santelli made an emphatic decision – he would be a musician.

Lenor Simpson has spent nearly 30 years training others in security and public safety. She understands that most of us feel the world is increasingly unsafe.

Every Saturday since 1970, rain or shine, vendors have set up booths to sell their wares in downtown Eugene. Little did Lotte Streisinger, founder of The Saturday Market, know that 48 years later her idea would have such staying power. It’s now the oldest weekly open-air crafts festival in the United States.

The Willamette Shore Trolley may be one of Oregon’s best-kept secrets, and a real gem for those who make the time for a ride. It’s only a mile and a half, but there’s so much to see and hear, it can take up to an hour and a half.

With the warmer weather and longer days, summertime is the perfect opportunity to get outside and be active. If you’re exercising outdoors this summer, or just having fun in the sun, it’s important to be aware of heat-related illnesses, like heat stroke and exhaustion, and know how to prevent them.

Several months ago, I was corresponding via email with famed plantsman Allan Armitage about — obviously — plants. In the course of our conversation, he offered me a copy of his latest book, “Of Naked Ladies and Forget-Me-Nots: The Stories Behind the Common Names of Some of Our Favorite Plants,” to read and review. I gladly accepted and promptly received the book in my mailbox.

It fills me with pride to have the local avian populations busily going about their birding duties in my garden. It’s affirmation that I’m doing something right by providing a safe habitat for them here in my little spot of earth.

Many of my patients say they use sunscreen on a daily basis, but they’ll still come into the office with sunburns or tans. (Worth noting: Even though a tan might not hurt like a burn and “looks better,” tans are harmful to the skin, too.) So, what gives?

Hear the word “barbecue” and what comes to mind? Warm summer gatherings? A piece of cooking equipment? Or does your mouth begin to water as you remember smoky, tangy flavors that delight your taste buds?