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Blending theology with creativity, Aumsville artist Don White loves to find ways to use his passion for art in his ministry.

In 1819, Donald McKenzie was exploring the Snake River for the Hudson’s Bay Company when he came to its confluence with another river. Unsure of its origin, he sent three members of his fur trapping expedition to further explore the river. They never returned.

Bo Russel has carried the personal impacts of the Vietnam War for years. His wife Judy says when she first met Bo more than 30 years ago, he was experiencing severe post-traumatic stress disorder which, even today, can keep him awake at night or cause him to be hypervigilant when he’s out and about.

Portland has a big heart — thanks in part to the efforts of Alain Bally. For the past 10 years, he has devoted thousands of hours as a volunteer, believing it builds “social capital.”

I’m dreaming of a faux Christmas — at least when it comes to the tree. Many older adults who spent years putting up a real tree now are opting to go with an artificial one. Their reasons vary, but convenience and longevity top the list.

In the past 35 years, Northwest Boomer and Senior News has seen some changes. Personnel come and go. Sometimes locations change. Even the business name changes. Such has been the case for Northwest Boomer and Senior News. Now, we’re about to undergo one of our biggest changes ever.

When Carl Arden Hinds envisioned opening a music school, he thought about what would have appealed to him as a 16-year-old musician: A place where students not only could hone their playing and writing skills, but also rehearse together, learn how to record tunes and perform live with a group.

Two Salem senior centers are taking steps to help the homeless and less-fortunate in their communities. “We still have two or three individuals who look for homeless coming for lunch at our Marion-Polk Food Share lunches,” says Donna Avina, president of South Salem Senior Center. “For quite a while after the homeless camp on Commercial near us was broken up, we had a number, mostly men. Most of these people are gone now, because we heard they broke up the two camps these groups had set up.

The Contreras family owns a small bakery but bakes traditional Mexican goodies with a big heart. “We love what we do,” says Maria Contreras, who runs Pilos Mexican Bakery in Corvallis with her parents, Celestino Contreras Padilla and Marcelina Lopez de Contreras, and brother Alberto Contreras.

When your whole world is just a bed and a few personal items, a bouquet of lovely flowers can make your day. Heidi Berkman discovered that fact when caring for her stepmother’s mother in her final days. She remembers how the mood indoors often matched the gloomy January weather outside. There was no sun to fill her stepmother’s condominium, and little to perk up her disposition.

Like most teens in the mid-1960s, Robert Santelli found himself glued to the television as Ed Sullivan introduced the Beatles. And, like so many, it was a life-changing experience. On that day — Feb. 9, 1964 — 12-year-old Santelli made an emphatic decision – he would be a musician.

Every Saturday since 1970, rain or shine, vendors have set up booths to sell their wares in downtown Eugene. Little did Lotte Streisinger, founder of The Saturday Market, know that 48 years later her idea would have such staying power. It’s now the oldest weekly open-air crafts festival in the United States.

Kyle Isaacs and Lori Killen Aus are part of a growing breed of mobile dental care providers who actually pack up their dental tools and come to their patients — from the home to the hospital and even to senior care facilities.

“Slow down” are two words Alice Carter does not keep in her verbal dictionary. “I like being very active,” says the 88-year-old, who finished two years of Peace Corps service last year. “The Peace Corps is a good way for seniors to serve in a meaningful way, making connections of a good kind with another country and its citizens.”

Do you remember newsreels before movies, Blackjack chewing gum, roller skate keys, Butch wax, party lines, and cereal with prizes in the box? Did your mom buy her groceries at a particular grocery store just to get that free dinner plate? Did the groceries come with an added bonus – S&H Green Stamps?

Financial donations from women have made possible an early scientific discovery that could have an impact on Alzheimer’s research. It brings new hope to the fight against this and related diseases wreaking havoc on those with memory loss. Dementia has emerged as one of the great medical challenges of our time.

For some older adults, the connectivity of personal computers, smartphones and Facebook changed their lives for the better. According to AARP, 76 percent of adults over age 50 own a desktop, laptop or tablet. Those aged 65 and younger, and those with higher incomes, are more likely to have access to the internet at home, as well as have a device and consistently use it.

Greenhill Humane Society runs two shelters — the smaller 1st Avenue Shelter, and the larger one, commonly known as Greenhill, on Green Hill Road in west Eugene. Greenhill staff does a great job of keeping the facility clean and inviting to the public, and as comfortable for the animals as possible. But the facility was built in the 1950s with very little updating over the years.

Dave Lemberg doesn’t remember how old he was when he first saw a commercial for TV Magic Cards, but he certainly recollects how it made him feel. He was so excited that the cards went straight on his Christmas wish list, and the eventual gift launched a lifelong interest in magic tricks. Lemberg grew up in southwest Washington and eventually became a teacher. Early in his career, he attended a convention where a presenter used magic tricks to teach science.

For many people, the start of a new year is a time to leave some habits behind and face the upcoming year with fresh motivation and a set of new commitments. For those living with a chronic disease or chronic pain, it can be hard to escape the daily challenges. The good news is, regardless of the type of illness, you can build skills and confidence for managing your health, staying active and enjoying your life.

Oregon’s labor market is doing great. “Jobs are being added at a very good rate,” says Nick Beleiciks, a state employment economist with the Oregon Employment Department. “In fact, Oregon has been adding jobs faster than the nation since 2013. The unemployment rate this year is the lowest it’s been in 40 years, which is as far back as comparative figures exist. These are signs that Oregon’s economy is doing well.”

Think knitting is just something your grandma used to do? Not so, says Jackie Howard Kraybill, owner of Northwest Wools in Portland. She believes a resurgence in knitting may be due to the unsettling times in which we live.

A local woman will have an important part in planning for the 250th anniversary of the United States, through the National Society Daughters of the American Revolution.

It turns out, Silver Falls State Park is a great place to birdwatch. “American Dippers at the waterfalls, a sheer abundance of Wilson’s Warbler and Pacific Wren and Red-breasted Sapsuckers just about everywhere,” says Steve Shunk, owner and lead guide of Paradise Birding. “You can catch the morning songs of the Varied Thrush and Swainson’s Thrush, and just being in the temperate rainforest habitat is invigorating.”

Do you know that honeybees travel about 55,000 miles and gather nectar from approximately two million blossoms just to make one pound of honey? Honeybees have been around for some 30 million years, and are one of the most important pollinators in Oregon agriculture, increasing crop yields and producing better produce, according to reports from beekeepers.